Ada’s Diet: One Day in January 1879

From December 16, 1878 to January 14, 1879, Englishwoman Madame Ada Anderson walked 2,700 quarter miles in 2,700 quarter hours at Mozart Garden in Brooklyn, NY. As news spread of her extraordinary endurance walk, her fame as a pedestrienne grew.

For those who weren’t able to attend the 28-day walk by the performer-turned-athlete, the newspapers of the day reported her progress down to the smallest detail. One New York newspaper even reported what Madame Anderson ate over a 24-hour period as she made her long walk.

Watch this video to see what her 19th century athlete’s diet included:

Also check out Harry Hall’s book at http://www.pedestrienne.com for more great stories about these amazing women.

3 thoughts on “Ada’s Diet: One Day in January 1879

  1. “My Grandfather’s Clock”

    My grandfather’s clock was too large for the shelf
    So it stood ninety years on the floor
    It was taller by half than the old man himself
    Though it weighed not a pennyweight more

    It was bought on the morn of the day that he was born
    And was always his treasure and pride
    But it stopped, short never to go again
    When the old man died

    Ninety years without slumbering
    tik,tlk,tik,tok
    His life seconds numbering
    tik,tok,tik,tok
    It stopped, short never to go again
    When the old man died

    My grandfather said that of those he could hire
    Not a servant so faithful he found
    For it wasted no time and had but one desire
    At the close of each week to be wound

    And it kept in its place, not a frown upon its face
    And its hands never hung by its side
    But it stopped short, never to go again
    When the old man died

    It rang and alarmed in the dead of the night
    An alarm that for years had been dumb
    And we knew that his spirit was pluming for flight
    That his hour for departure had come

    Still the clock kept the time with a soft and muffled chime
    As we silently stood by his side
    But it stopped short, never to go again
    When the old man died

    Ninety years without slumbering
    His life seconds numbering
    It stopped short, never to go again
    When the old man died

    Like

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